Все книги про: «Trucker»







Naughty-Nine Tales of Christmas Steve Hockensmith


"It's the most wonderful time of the year," the old song tells us. But that doesn't mean the people celebrating it are always so nice. Criminals get the Christmas spirit, too! In this collection of hilarious short stories, you'll see what the thieves, killers, psychos and scumbags are up to come the holidays…and it's not caroling door to door. Well, not unless they're casing the neighborhood for a break-in, as a rag-tag gang does in the title story. You'll also meet a mall elf menaced by a very, very bad Santa (in "I Killed Santa Claus"), a London police inspector hunting for the man who murdered Ebenezer Scrooge (in "Humbug"), a trucker out to save his shipment of Cabbage Patch Dolls from bumbling hijackers (in "Special Delivery") and many more characters you'll never forget. Originally published in Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine and Alfred Hitchcock Mystery Magazine, these nine tales from award-winning short story master Steve Hockensmith (Dawn of the Dreadfuls, Holmes on the Range)…


The Grim Reaper's Dance Judy Clemens


When Casey Maldonado and Death hitch a desperate ride away from one disaster, they throw themselves right into the middle of another one.  The semi in which they are traveling crashes, and before the Grim Reaper takes Evan the Trucker away, Evan whispers to Casey about a stash hidden in the truck that she should keep away from them.  Them turns out to be a band of men who want that package no matter what it takes, and they believe Casey knows where – and what – it is.  Alone and injured, with neither money nor identification, Casey escapes from under the noses of the ER doctors and her pursuers, and hides out in the cornfields of Kansas.  The valuable stash turns out to be photos, truck manifests, and other information pointing Casey toward something big and complicated – a conspiracy?  Smuggling?  Blackmail?  She can’t be sure. Casey, uncertain how to proceed, is led by Death to a group of teenagers looking for something other than dust and crops to fill their days –…


The O Henry Prize Stories 2005 Kevin Brockmeier


Usually, this is where the rhapsody would begin; strings would swell; breasts would be clasped with great feeling: The short story isn't dead; it lives! I will abstain. If you're interested in The O. Henry Prize Stories 2005 at all, you're already an adherent of short prose, and know that it's alive and flourishing (as long as you can track it down on the smaller and smaller presses to which it's often relegated). If the short story's cachet has evinced some decline over the course of the past century, it's a decline in public exposure and lucrative potential, not in quality. In terms of sales and public profile, the short story collection can't keep apace with the novel or pop nonfiction, but it's still absolutely kicking poetry's ass on all fronts, and, like poetry, remains in general more adventurous, fluid, and vitally modern than its novelistic big brother. To review these stories in terms of their quality seems redundant – that they're terrific is a no-brainer. Entering its eighty-fifth…


One Christmas Knight Kathleen Creighton


Away in a – truck stop? FA LA LA LA – LABOR! Okay, maybe driving solo cross-country in her eighth month wasn't the most brilliant idea Mirabella Waskowitz had ever had. And maybe she should have turned back when she heard the blizzard warnings. But the feisty mom-to-be certainly didn't need advice from that strapping Southern trucker who kept crossing her path… UNTIL HER WATER BROKE. Here it was Christmas Eve, and single dad Jimmy Joe Starr wanted only to be home with his young son. Instead, he was snowbound with a beautiful "virgin" who was about to give birth. Jimmy Joe had long ago stopped believing in miracles. But Mirabella and her baby were about to change that…


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